THE TEMPEST

I do not own/ claim to own or took this picture. The photograph is only linked to my review to give the reader a better insight in my comment.

I do not own/ claim to own or took this picture. The photograph is only linked to my review to give the reader a better insight in my comment.

I do not own/ claim to own or took this picture. The photograph is only linked to my review to give the reader a better insight in my comment.

I do not own/ claim to own or took this picture. The photograph is only linked to my review to give the reader a better insight in my comment.

I do not own/ claim to own or took this picture. The photograph is only linked to my review to give the reader a better insight in my comment.

I do not own/ claim to own or took this picture. The photograph is only linked to my review to give the reader a better insight in my comment.

I do not own/ claim to own or took this picture. The photograph is only linked to my review to give the reader a better insight in my comment.

I do not own/ claim to own or took this picture. The photograph is only linked to my review to give the reader a better insight in my comment.

This annual Stafford Shakespeare Festival production “The Tempest” was a multi-disciplinary performance which let me feel satisfied and proud.

The characters plotted intrigues and made plans during the entire play and tried to achieve what they wanted. In the end they did get what they needed or deserved and this kind of happy ending made me satisfied for the characters.

I felt proud because I worked backstage on this production and to see a show growing and evolving daily for four weeks and then celebrating a successful press night, meant a lot to me.

The set it-self was half a boat, including a 1930’s show drum, and the other half was the island with Caliban’s tent and Prospero’s cell. Frances Collier’s (Production Designer) special interest in the spirit and clothing of the 1930’s was a main reason why the story was set in 1934 on an island of the somalian-italian colony. Her smart design combined all needed places in one design and this hosted the characters well and put the audience right on the island next to the shipwrecked crew.

To build up this magical island, magical tricks were included in the set as well and some actors even had to learn magical tricks to play their role even better. Additional to the play, music with lyrics was composed, which lightened up the long Shakespearian dialogues and emphasized the enchanted place. The effective and well balanced use of sound and light effects simulated the storm and seeing the actors interact with those, created the atmosphere of a tempest.

It makes me really happy to announce that the Shakespeare Festival received three five star reviews from notable publications and it certainly was one of the best productions I have seen in a while.

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